Microphones

[Experts Recommended] BEST kind of mics for film making

Last updated on May 12th, 2022 at 09:32 am

What is the best kind of mics for filmmaking?  There’s an insatiable curiosity that comes with wanting to make films and it especially comes when you’re studying to be a director. You start to notice details you never noticed before or simply forgotten about. One such detail would be: what kind of audio do I use?

Let’s get to the basics of the best microphone for filmmaking

1. Dynamic Microphone

a kind of microphone for film making - condenserDynamic microphones are the most commonly used microphones in film making. They are usually used for close up shots, because they can pick up sounds from a greater distance than condenser microphones. Most Dynamic mics are also more durable and have better sound quality than dynamic microphones.

Dynamic mics have several benefits over condenser mics:

They’re more durable – dynamic mics can be dropped, stepped on, or kicked without breaking

There’s no need for phantom power – dynamic mics don’t require an external power source to operate, so you don’t have to worry about running out of batteries or dealing with an empty mic stand because you forgot to bring your adapter with you on set!

They’re less expensive – there are many great dynamic mics under $100 that would cost thousands if they were condenser models!

2. Condenser Microphones

condenser microphones - best kind of mics for film makingCondenser mics are used in film making to capture sound, especially vocals and dialogue. They are also used for recording musical instruments and live performances.

Condenser mic is usually more expensive than dynamic mic, as they need a power supply, which is usually provided by a battery or phantom power. The quality of the sound depends on the quality of the preamp (or microphone amplifier) that is built into the mic itself. Condenser mics require good preamps because they can be very sensitive to noise and interference.

With higher frequency response Condenser mics pick up more detail than dynamic mics, but they are often less forgiving when it comes to handling noise and interference from other sources such as room noise or unwanted sounds from other objects nearby.

3. Boom Microphones

Boom microphones are a necessity for film making offering better audio quality. They are used to record sound from a distance and to keep the microphone out of the shot. A boom operator is often required to operate the boom pole and hold the boom mic.mics for film making

Boom poles come in various sizes and lengths depending on the type of microphone being used. For example, a short shotgun mic can be held at arms length while a long shotgun mic may require an extension pole to reach far away subjects.

The most common type of boom pole is called a telescoping boom pole because it collapses down into several smaller pieces when not in use. Telescoping poles allow you to store them easily when not in use while still being able to extend them out when needed.

4. Cardiods

The cardioid is a type of microphone which has an extremely narrow pickup pattern. It’s often used for recording sound in spaces where you don’t want to pick up any ambient noise, like a room with a lot of hard surfaces like glass or metal.

he cardioid is also popular for use on stage because it can help isolate the sound source from other instruments and performers while still picking up the voice clearly.

The cardioid has become the go-to microphone for most professional studios because of its versatility and its ability to isolate sounds well. However their usage in film making is shrinking with time.

5. Wireless Microphone

They allow for greater freedom of movement for the performer, and they provide the ability to conceal the microphone in areas where it might otherwise be too visible.

wireless mic - best kind for film making

The most common wireless microphone system is the body-worn type. This is a microphone that has an attached transmitter that is worn on the body by the performer, typically clipped to their belt or tucked into their clothing.

The signal is then sent wirelessly through frequencies assigned by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to a receiver that is usually mounted on a camera or carried by an assistant. The receiver converts the analog audio signal back into digital data for use with cameras, audio recorders and other digital devices.

Read: Best Mic For ASMR To Record Great Quality Sound

Here are some of the most popular types of wireless microphones in film making:

Lavalier Microphones

These are small microphones that clip onto your subjects’ clothing. They have a very short range and need to be within a few feet of the receiver in order to work properly. They’re usually used for on-camera interviews or B roll shots where the subject isn’t moving too much around the room.

Headworn Microphones

These are larger versions of lav mics that clip onto an actor’s head instead of their clothing. They’re often used for stunt scenes where an actor has to move around more than usual and can’t wear an earpiece or listen in from another room like they would with an earpiece or boom mic setup.

Handheld Wireless Microphones

These are handheld transmitters that send audio signals up to 300 feet away from the receiver using FM radio waves (the same type used by commercial radio stations). They’re usually used when there’s no time available for setting up sound design.

Are all of these USB microphones?

All of these mics used in film making are USB microphones, so you can plug them directly into your computer. You might also be able to attach them to your smartphone or tablet if it has the right type of jack port, but this is less common.

It is important to note that just because it is a usb microphone enabled doesn’t mean it will work with every computer. Others require special software to work properly with certain software programs like Adobe Audition or Sony Vegas Pro.

If you’re looking for a microphone that will work on both of these platforms and with many other audio-editing applications, you’ll want one with a standard 1/4″ input jack. 

1. Sennheiser MKE Camcorder Shotgun Mic

Best Shotgun Mic for Film

Excellent quality and sound microphone.

The Sennheiser is with reason no one on our best shotgun mic for a film.

Sennheiser, the brand, is one of the most celebrated manufacturers of grander audio recording devices in the world today.

Slim and unremarkable yet talented at delivering audio that’s been attentive with pin-point precision, It will bring an astounding quality to all of your voice recordings.

 

The Sennheiser MKE Camcorder Shotgun Mic ticks our box
  • for on best shotgun mic for DSLR,
  • external mic for camcorder,
  • shotgun mic for a camera,
  • great external mic for a video camera,
  • microphone for video production and
  • Quality shotgun microphone for interviews.

The essential specifics of this mic is its fabulous focus.

You can expect to hear nothing bar the sound recorded.

Expect a balanced, natural tone with minimal noise interference and excellent concentration.

  • Amazing sound quality.
  • Side noise rejection.
  • Phantom or battery powered. AA batteries will give you 150hours of recording
  • the DSLR cameras are compatible.
  • Light-weight.

CONS

  • Expensive at $300+ price.

 

2. Rode NTG Shotgun Microphone

Best Shotgun Mic for film

The NTG2 is in the top two of our list as it is

the best shotgun mic for DSLR,

external mic for camcorder,

leading shotgun mic for a camera,

best external mic for a video camera,

prime microphone for video production

and the best shotgun microphone for interviews.

Rode shotgun mics are famous for two things
  • Offering exceptional audio-recording devices that give you the best regardless of their price
  • and the best insurance of quality with their 10-year warranty, which leaves no doubt when it comes to their microphones’ quality.

The NTG2 is most famous for best-performance and most cost-effective models that won’t disappoint.

 

Recording sound with the NTG2 shotgun mic is nearly indistinguishable from hearing.

Due to exceptional off-axis rejection, sounds that are not appropriate won’t record.

You can assume to hear perfectly coherent and isolated audio even in harsh environments where noise levels can reach 130 decibels.

The durability of the NTG2 assures that you won’t need to worry on bumpy rides or unfavorable weather conditions.

 

  • Outstanding sound quality
  • Tough hard construction
  • Two power sources
  • High pass filter

CONs

  • Poorly-made windshield
  • Has no off switch

 

3. TascamTM-2X Stereo X-Y mic Shotgun Mic for Film

Does the image stabilization sound that your DSLR camera makes annoy you. The Tascam Tm 2X has been specifically manufactured to address the unwanted sound that comes into your audio.

You will notice a strange looking extension that screws onto your camera on one end and the mic on the other when seeing you Tascam Tm2X for the first time.

This seclusion arm will abolish the stabilization noises, as it brings the mic into the forefront and away from the camera.

With that infuriation out of the way, you can focus on the audio you want to record. The microphone has two capsules that document along two axes.

Thus letting you emphasis one on the person you’re talking to, while the other can pick up the ambient noise.

The finished result is a delightful recording that places the subject of the gathering in a naturally atmosphere.

The TM-2X is compatible with the DSLRs via a hot shoe mount and shares the camera’s battery.

The Tascam TM2X has made our list due to it being the best shotgun mic for dslr

 

  • Portability
  • Quality and price
  • Produces natural-sounding recordings
  • Eliminates camera noise

CONs

  • Flimsy isolation arm

 

4. TAKSTAR SGC 598 Interview Microphone

Takstar’s interview shotgun mic, makes it no 4 on our best shotgun mic for film although certainly not as good or durable as other mics we’ve reviewed still has the ability to outshine many onboard mic by a perceptible margin.

As it won’t cost you your life’s savings, it’s the best choice if you are uncertain what kind of an alteration a shotgun mic makes and want to find out.

Sharp-eared fanatics may detect some static, but anyone else probably won’t notice or mind.

The mic’s pickup is cardioid, which is excellent for noise reduction.

The shock mount does away with camera handling noises and cable chafing.

There’s also a convenient feature which lets you increase its output by 10 decibels.

Used properly, it allows you to single out muffled conversations or isolate voices in a crowd.

It needs an AA battery to work, but will do so for 100 hours per battery, making it quite economical.

PROs

  • Excellent value for the money
  • Good for recording interviews
  • Has a +10db boost function

CONs

  • Cheap build quality
  • Recordings can suffer from static

 

5. Rodeo VideoMic Go Shotgun Mic

Rode’s entry-level, lightweight shotgun mic delivers reputable performance for the beginner videographer or anyone that wishes to make a video with sound quality. That is miles better than what they’d get with the onboard audio of their recording device, yet don’t want the bother of lugging around batteries and microphones.

Weighing in at just 1.5 ounces, it is one of the lightest shotgun mics out there. It does a satisfactory job of isolating the sounds you want to hear, even in windy or congested environments.

You have its shoehorn mount and the Rycote Lyre and included fluffy windshield to thank for that.

The Lyre is a durable shoe mount that helps remove vibration, sounds of you handling the camera, and more.

PROs

  • Easily Ported & very lightweight
  • Doesn’t depend on internal batteries
  • Comes with lots of accessories for the price

CONs

  • Overall Quality of sound not so great

 

What is a BOOM Microphone

Did you know that “The first noted use of a boom mic was on the set of Beggars of Life (1928)?

Wellman wanted a tracking shot of two actors walking down a street, and the sound man refused,

Wellman said, “that’s crazy” and instructed the soundman to put the microphone on a broom-handle and walk along the actors,

In general, when people in the audio and film industries talk about a boom microphone, they mean the microphone mostly used in video production.

Shotgun boom mics work astoundingly well in the world of film/broadcasting and hardly used in other fields that require audio.

This boom microphone has a directional shotgun pattern.

Shotgun Mic Boom pole kit

When you purchase a Rode VideoMic Directional Video Condenser Microphone w/Mount, you will get a microphone working straight out of the box,

The eStudioStar expert bundle comes with:

  • Rode VideoMic Directional Video Condenser Microphone w/Mount
  • accessible MS101 Microphone Stand with Boom
  • Hosa MHE-125 1/8 Inch Headphone Extention Cable – 25 foot
  • WindTech M-1 5/8″-27 Female to 3/8″-16 Male Thread Adapter
  • WindTech MM-4 Mic-Muff Windscreen

What is a BOOM Microphone

Did you know that “The first noted use of a boom mic was on the set of Beggars of Life (1928)?

Wellman wanted a tracking shot of two actors walking down a street, and the sound man refused,

Wellman said, “that’s crazy” and instructed the soundman to put the microphone on a broom-handle and walk along the actors,

In the most comprehensive of definitions, a boom microphone is a microphone that is attached to a boom (a pole like adaptor).

The term mic boom typically refers to a boom pole that holds a microphone at one end and is held out-of-frame in film settings by a boom handler.

In general, when people in the audio and film industries talk about a boom microphone, they mean the microphone mostly used in video production.

Shotgun boom mics work astoundingly well in the world of film/broadcasting and hardly used in other fields that require audio.

This boom microphone has a directional shotgun pattern.

Shotgun Mic Boom pole kit

When you purchase a Rode VideoMic Directional Video Condenser Microphone w/Mount, you will get a microphone working straight out of the box,

The eStudioStar expert bundle comes with:

  • Rode VideoMic Directional Video Condenser Microphone w/Mount
  • accessible MS101 Microphone Stand with Boom
  • Hosa MHE-125 1/8 Inch Headphone Extention Cable – 25 foot
  • WindTech M-1 5/8″-27 Female to 3/8″-16 Male Thread Adapter
  • WindTech MM-4 Mic-Muff Windscreen

What is a Shotgun Mic for Film

A BEST SHOTGUN MIC FOR FILM is a highly guiding mic.

The shotgun mic must be pointed directly at its target sound source for suitable recording; otherwise, the audio recording will be soft and very unclear.

As they use unidirectional microphones, the sound must come directly from the front when sounds move to the sides and rear the sound quality worsens.

When interviewing an individual, then a Shotgun Mic for Film will be what you need to trying to isolate the sound coming from a speaker’s mouth.

When shooting outside of a controlled environment, i.e., studio or stage background noise is the biggest problem any sound recordist will and can face. With one of the best shotgun mic for film, consumers have found that they can record dialogue in almost any situation.

Making recording more comfortable, and you don’t have to take as many “takes” of a scene. Thus said, it does mean you will probably need someone to assist with holding a boom pole.

We’re going on a journey to see the best shotgun mic for a film that is designed to be used on-camera but works off-camera as well.

I will give you a guide touching base on

  • shotgun mic for DSLR,
  • external mic for camcorder,
  • best shotgun mic for a camera,
  • external mic for a video camera,
  • microphone for video production
  • Interview shotgun microphones.

When producing a film , the most crucial aspect it the sound quality. Without a shotgun mic, that foley sound of anything dropping to the floor would suffer from too much environmental noise to be useful.

The number one question is what to look for in a shotgun mic?

And that is why I have assembled this guide on the best shotgun microphone for a film.

The first problem when buying a shotgun mic is budget, and there is a wide variety of microphones, and they differ from $100 to thousands of dollars. You need to know what group and range you fall into for your specific need for a Shotgun microphone.

If your budget can’t allow an expensive shotgun and its only for use on your DSLR occasionally, there are a few things to consider.

The longer the mic, the better they suppress unintended sounds.

For a camera-mounted mic, it is better to get a long mic that won’t be in your shots when using a wide-angle lens. Another feature to think about is what exactly are you planning on producing.

Let the recording begin

Conclusion

A shotgun mic might pick up noise than a lavalier mic. It also makes your interviewee or actors’ voices come through close and clear. 

For that reason, shotgun mics (with a boom pole) are usually the ones you’ll hear about being used in story filmmaking. It is certainly not the top pick of the best kind of mics for filmmaking.

Expensive shotgun MICs do not inevitably mean that they will be ideal for your project, so get the mic that is specific to your needs.

For those just beginning their filming adventures, I hope that the guide introduced you to some new perceptions that you may not have come across on your own.

The mic is not erogenous. We don’t get the same blast buying a mic as we do a new camera, but it can bump up your video to a new height and is of grave significance. Your sound is what makes the footage fail or not.

The type of microphone is very reliant on the situation you want to create. Ask yourself, what am I looking for in my video podcast solution, live show, or narrative? Use the apparatus that gives you the best in producing the sound you are wanting. A tip if you take your sound audio seriously, audiences will surely take your video seriously.

Audio Technica AT897

Audio Technica AT897 is a great choice for anyone who wants to have a high-quality sound experience. The sound quality is excellent, and the bass is very rich. The headphones are comfortable to wear for long periods of time, and they are lightweight.

It is a large-diaphragm condenser microphone with a switchable low-cut filter that delivers good performance for a wide variety of applications. The AT897 has been a standard in the music industry for many years now, and continues to be one of our most popular microphones.

Videomic pro

Videomic Pro is a small, lightweight and easy to use video microphone designed for use with Canon DSLRs and camcorders. It features a super cardioid pattern that reduces noise from the sides and rear of the mic.

Rode Videomic Pro

The rode video mic pro is a handheld microphone for filmmaking. It has a built-in stereo microphone, which allows you to record sound directly onto your camera. It also has an inbuilt pop shield to reduce wind noise and filter out background noise, which is especially useful when filming outdoors. The Rode video mic pro comes with an adjustable shoe mount that fits all cameras with a shoe mount socket.

Wireless Lav Mics

Wireless lav mics operate similarly to wired ones in that they transmit sound from one point (i.e., the performer) to another (i.e., your receiver). However, instead of using cables, wireless lav mics use radio frequencies (RF) to send signals between each component within your system’s chain of devices — including transmitters, receivers, and hookups for earpieces.

Bluetooth Lavalier Microphone System:

This type of wireless lav mic system and lavalier microphone price is one of the most popular ones in use today. This type of system uses Bluetooth technology to connect with other devices such as laptops, computers or smartphones etc. It allows users to record high quality audio without having to worry about any cables getting tangled up or interfering with their recording process.

Videomic NTG

VideoMic is a directional microphone designed for use with DSLR, camcorder, and other video shooting setups. It will reduce noise in your videos as well as produce great quality sound at a distance. The VideoMic is available in two different versions: the VideoMic Pro and the VideoMic GO.

The pro version has options for the user to add wind-protection filters and XLR connectors for professional use. The GO version does not have these features but it does come with an adapter that can plug into the iPhone or iPad’s headphone jack.

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I am William Parker, an RV lover, an adventurer - in short, Beaver Instincts. I am also a professional content creator who knows fairly well how to compare different products, services and sites.

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